Arts & Culture

12/04/18 Arts & Culture , Australia , Diaspora & Travel , Society & Politics # , , , , , , , , , , ,

Cultural Knowledge

Cultural Knowledge

By  Rashida Murphy

 

Such a loaded term – cultural knowledge – coming as it does with its own set of expectations and hints of secrets. When I try to unpack it a little, I think about how knowledge differs from appropriation and what the keepers of cultural knowledge can do to protect themselves from stealth and theft. And the answer is – very little. We live in times of exchange and borrowings and slippages and it is hard to skid to a stop, metaphorically speaking, and say – ‘You have gone too far.’

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30/03/18 Arts & Culture , Australia , Diaspora & Travel , Society & Politics # ,

Welcome to our new Guest Contributor, Rashida Murphy

Welcome to our new Guest Contributor, Rashida Murphy

Southern Crossings is thrilled to announce that the brilliant Rashida Murphy will be joining us as our new Guest Contributor for the next few months.

Rashida Murphy has published short fiction and poetry in various international journals and anthologies, including Westerly, Open Road Review and Veils Halos and Shackles. Her novel, The Historian’s Daughter was shortlisted in the Dundee International Book Prize and published by UWA Publishing in 2016. She was Writer-In-Residence at the Katherine Susannah Prichard Writers Centre in 2017 and is currently an Adjunct at Edith Cowan University in Perth. Recently, her short story, Strands of Jupiter, was shortlisted in the Newcastle Short Story Prize. Her essays and stories are forthcoming in Landscapes Journal, Red Hen Anthology and an anthology to be published by Orient Longman later this year.

We are honoured that she has joined us in our aim to collectively reimagine Australia, South Asia, and the world. We can’t wait to read her new work in Southern Crossings.

 

Read more about her herehttps://rashidawritenow.wordpress.com

Buy The Historian’s Daughter at all good bookshops, and herehttps://uwap.uwa.edu.au/collections/rashida-murphy

 

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31/12/17 Arts & Culture , Australia , Diaspora & Travel # , , , , ,

Coming home to curious creatures

Coming home to curious creatures

By Ruchira Talukdar

 

I live close to the Yarra, along one of its many bends, which is also home to a colony of flying foxes. The long evenings at this time of the year offer the perfect opportunity to gaze at these curious creatures as they take off on their nocturnal sojourns.

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22/11/17 Arts & Culture

Southern Crossings’ end-of-year catch-up

Southern Crossings’ end-of-year catch-up

Join us at our end-of-year catch-up with new and old friends, colleagues, allies, collaborators and co-conspirators. All welcome, including kids.

Date: Saturday, December 2, 2017

Time: 6:30 pm onwards

Place: The Henson, 91 Illawarra Rd, Marrickville NSW 2204 Ph: +61 2 9569 5858 .

For an indication of the cost of food and drink see http://www.thehenson.com.au

 

Photo by Ian Schneider on Unsplash

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16/11/17 Arts & Culture , Australia , Diaspora & Travel , Society & Politics # , , , , , ,

The Onion Of Gay Identity and Dr. Seuss

The Onion Of Gay Identity and Dr. Seuss

By Mayank Teria

 

Imagine a tense spring in a pinball machine, all coiled up and compacted, rearing to go. That’s what your body feels like, a pinball trigger, when you’re in the closet. That is what my body felt like when I was in the closet.

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14/08/17 Arts & Culture , Australia , Diaspora & Travel , Society & Politics # , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Some observations in three colours on ‘Beyond Tick Boxes’

Some observations in three colours on ‘Beyond Tick Boxes’

By Roanna Gonsalves

(This is a reworked version of the summary observations I was invited to present at the conclusion of ‘Beyond Tick Boxes’, a symposium organised by Diversity Arts Australia, or DARTS, at Casula Powerhouse, on Thursday, June 29, 2017)

 

Good afternoon everyone. I’d also like to acknowledge the indigenous people of this country, the Cabrogal Clan of the Darug Nation, on whose land we have gathered today. I would like to say thank you to Lena Nahlous and Kevin Bathman for inviting me to give you a very short and incredibly opinionated summary of my observations today.

I have three main observations. They are colour-coded: red, black and yellow.

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14/08/17 Arts & Culture , Australia , Diaspora & Travel , Society & Politics # , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Writer ‘Abroad’ and the Readers ‘Back Home’

The Writer ‘Abroad’ and the Readers ‘Back Home’

By Prakash Subedi

 

 

To be a non-white writer in the west today is probably very different from it was, say, fifty years ago. Books and ideas travel much faster now, and even if you are writing and publishing in the west, there are more and more people back home who have access to your works. And while this was always the case to some extent, it is now truer than ever that the most passionate responses and vociferous objections to your work are likely to come from readers at home. More often than not, by virtue of being based in a western country and writing about your home, your writing is treated with wariness and your motives with suspicion.

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14/08/17 Arts & Culture , Australia , Diaspora & Travel , Society & Politics # , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Whose culture is it anyway?

Whose culture is it anyway?

By Rashida Murphy

 

When the editors of Southern Crossings invited me to write about the idea that migrant writers use their cultural history, ethnicity and language to mobilise the ‘exotic’ nature of our cultural cache, I was keen to explore this idea further. The notion that what was previously considered a handicap is now desirable, catches me by surprise and brings to mind the (in) famous question asked by Jana Wendt of Toni Morrison in 1998.

 

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24/01/17 Arts & Culture

Rhythm in Tasmania’s Western Arthurs

Rhythm in Tasmania’s Western Arthurs

By Ruchira Talukdar

Photo Credit: David McLean

I recently walked the rugged and remote Western Arthur Range in Tasmania’s South West Wilderness National Park with a group of friends and came back with a head full of ruminations. This article is inspired by my experiences on the hike.

 

There is so much romanticism attached to Tasmania’s rugged and remote south-west wilderness. Some of it should chafe an environmental activist such as me with a quintessentially “Southern” core. Its isolation from human civilisation is its virtue. Unlike the Himalayas, that challenge and dazzle the human spirit and are yet comfortingly peopled, these weathered and very old glacial landscapes at the southern tip of the Australian continent have been protected for good from human activity through green fights and government laws.

 

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22/09/16 Arts & Culture , Australia , Diaspora & Travel , Society & Politics # , , , , ,

The furore over cultural appropriation

The furore over cultural appropriation

By Arjun Rajkhowa

 

American writer Lionel Shriver recently delivered a keynote speech at the Brisbane Writer’s Festival where she discussed cultural appropriation, authorial autonomy, social expectations around works of art and a host of other subjects that have arguably been at the forefront of much critical debate in recent times.

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